BLOG


​Kitchen Countertop Materials

02-09-2018

Photo by Kyle Head on Unsplash. License.

I was helping my daughter having her kitchen remodelled recently. She was having problems trying to decide on a new countertop material. Walking through the counters area in Home Depot gave her a few ideas, but she was still undecided when the time came to choose a month later. I decided to write out a quick comparison of all the materials and costs for her and when I was done I thought other people might find it useful as well, so here goes.

Laminate countertops

Most people are familiar with laminate countertops. (Formica is one brand name). They’re a thin surface of high-pressure laminate applied to a thicker base of plywood or particleboard.

Pluses: The standby, available in literally hundreds of patterns and colors, laminates are the least expensive (next to tile) and durable, requiring less upkeep than tile.

Minuses: Easy to scorch with hot cookware, the use of layers in their construction makes it tricky to repair chips, show scratches, especially lighter colors, so not usable as a cutting surface. Less durable than natural stone or solid surface; use with under mount sinks is not recommended. Cost: $25 to $50 foot.

Solid surfacing

(Brand names Corian, Fountainhead, Avonite and Surrell), a newer countertop material, is durable and mimics the appearance of natural stone materials like marble or granite.

Pluses: Gives seamless surfaces, easy to care for. High impact resistance, easily repaired, nonporous and seamless, so won't trap dirt, collect bacteria or stain; easily.

Minuses: May melt from hot pot; looks non-natural in some color schemes, licensed contractor required for installation and repair work. Cost: $60 to $110 per foot.

Natural woods

Used in butcher-block style arrangement. Maple, oak and other hardwoods, make durable and elegant countertops.

Pluses: Good surface for cutting foods; scratches easily repaired by sanding; easy match with wood cabinets and floors.

Minuses: Requires a finish to preserve appearance, may scorch with hot cookware, allows bacterial growth, so needs regular cleaning. Not practical for entire countertop – good for small sections. Cost: $50 to $75 per foot

Granite

Popular for their elegant and rich look, natural stone countertops will last longer than most kitchens.

Pluses: Adds to value of home, hard durable surface, very heat resistant.

Minuses: very expensive, requires care since it is porous and must be sealed periodically, grease will stain. Cost: 60 to $200 per foot for granite $60 to $130 per foot for marble (stains easily and not recommended for food prep countertop)

Ceramic or Porcelain Tile: This is the countertop material my daughter was replacing. While the counters were in pretty bad shape, refurbishing was an option. Tile has a comforting, classic look and is inexpensive.

Pluses: Easy to clean up after a mess. More heat resistant than laminates solid surfaces, inexpensive, unless you are thinking about custom or hand-painted tiles.

Minuses: Can chip and crack easily; needs regular maintenance to keep bacteria out of grout. Scrubbing grout. Cost: $10 to $25 per foot.

So, what countertop material did she choose in the end? For its reasonable cost and reparability, Corian got the nod for the new kitchen. We found a color that was very close to a granite look and we also liked the ten year warranty.